Security on a Django app – HTTPS everywhere

Authentication credentials between your site and your end users must be secret. Is your site secure enough?

One important step is to use HTTPS everywhere in your Django website, and in this post we will show you how to implement it.

In particular, if you are deploying your App on Heroku, don’t miss this post 😉
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How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part IV

This is the fourth part of a series on how to deploy a Django app on Heroku.

How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part I.

How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part II.

How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part III.

You will see that the main idea behind these posts is not to build a functional Django app. Instead, what I want to do is to give you a bunch of good practices on how to build a Django app with different environments for testing, developing and production, useful packages installed, Internationalization and Localization properly configured, PostgreSQL installed, and much more.

PART IV

The topics covered here are:

  • Install South and run it both on your local machine and on Heroku
  • Prepare your app to support different languages
  • Prepare your app to support Localization
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How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part III

This is the third part of a series on how to deploy a Django app on Heroku.

How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part I.

How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part II.

You will see that the main idea behind these posts is not to build a functional Django app. Instead, what I want to do is to give you a bunch of good practices on how to build a Django app with different environments for testing, developing and production, useful packages installed, Internationalization and Localization properly configured, PosgreSQL installed, and much more.

PART III

The topics covered here are:

  • configure PostgreSQL in your local machine
  • configure PostgreSQL in Heroku
  • syncdb and Django shell in Heroku
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How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part II

This is the second part of a series on how to deploy a Django app on Heroku. If you haven’t looked at the first part, you might want to do it now. Go to How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part I.

You will see that the main idea behind these posts is not to build a functional Django app. Instead, what I want to do is to give you a bunch of good practices on how to build a Django app with different environments for testing, developing and production, useful packages installed, Internationalization and Localization properly configured, PosgreSQL installed, and much more.

PART II

The topics covered here are:

  • set different settings.py files for development, production and testing
  • save all the templates of your app in the same location
  • set debug false in production
  • install HTML5 Boilerplate
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How to deploy a Django app on Heroku. Part I

This post is the first post of a series on how to deploy a Django project on Heroku.

You will see that the main idea behind these posts is not to build a functional Django app. Instead, what I want to do is to give you a bunch of good practices on how to build a Django app with different environments for testing, developing and production, useful packages installed, Internationalization and Localization properly configured, PosgreSQL installed, and much more.

PART I

This post explains how to create a Django project on Heroku. For this first part, I followed the tutorial Django on Heroku, and some ideas from the deploydjango website.

The topics covered here are:

  • set up Heroku
  • set up PostgreSQL
  • start a Django app in a Virtualenv
  • set the Procfile
  • specify the dependencies
  • separate your applications and your libraries
  • set the settings.py file
  • push your app in Heroku
  • change the name of your app

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